LAST CHANCE FOR A FREE READ

We have a new book that is free for download today on Amazon. If you like hardboiled detective series, you won’t get too much better than Bill’s version. Bill, as an FYI, is a Vietnam vet, and he first wrote this when he was on a Maryland state arts grant. 

There are 3 more in the series too, so if you like this, more are coming. This one is free until midnight tonight, 11/29/2021.


You can download it to any device:  laptop, tablet, smartphone, and read it whenever, or share it (you can let another person read it, also for free). You do not have to read it today, but you can only “obtain” it today.(Amazon limits how much we can give away).

Get it now!

HOW TO SELL YOUR BOOK, POST 4: THE KEY TO SELL THE BOOK OF AN UNKOWN AUTHOR

Why do you try a new restaurant in your town?

Is it because you’re desperate to get out of the house, have someone else cook for you, or do you like to be the first to try anything new in town, or maybe you’re a foodie?

Or is it because your local paper told you it was good? The food critic on the town Facebook page said it was yummy. The neighbor on Nextdoor said it was a lot of food!

Who are you really? Who knows about you? Are you a former president, co-writing a book with another famous person, and your already overflowing wallet gets a little harder to get into your back pocket?

Or are you just… you? Like me, you could just be a writer, writing quietly at home.

Well, if your book is going to sell, newbie to being published, it’s going to sell online (and maybe 10 copies at your local bookseller). If you pay-to-play, and the “publisher” gives you a box with a thousand books in it, where are you putting them? On a shelf… at home?

It’s not a secret. When your book is available, in print, you have a few days, to a month, where your book is “hot,” meaning the people who know you, or who are local to you, are noticing it. Then, it’s over, and you should turn your focus to your next book.

That ride was short!

It reminds me of when I did community theater as a kid. We would practice almost every Saturday from January to June, and then, two weekend performances, Sat. & Sun., so four total, and it was over. Photos went in the local paper after the fact, and the lights went down until the following January.

You want your book to sell, to be a topic of conversation, to be on NPR! I know I do. But NPR doesn’t know you, and even if they did, there are so many other people who have a track record who also put out books the exact same day and time as you about the same thing, and they are getting on NPR, not you, because they were already on there two years ago.

Okay Captain Bringdown. Now what?

What matter most of all are reviews of your book until you are famous enough not to need them.

What I want most, as an author, is to be read. I want to know someone liked my book/story/poem. And sales would be nice too

Most new authors will generate most of their sales from Amazon. You will probably generate more sales than you will reviews. Our first book sold into the hundreds on Amazon, but got 9 reviews there.

Nine reviews is not building a web. It’s not being suggested to people. “Mary bought Book A and Book B, you bought Book B. Mary gave Book B a high review, and Book A. Would you like to look at Book A? Amazon actually asks me on my Alexa about the authors I buy for my daughter. “Grace Lin has a new book out. Can I put it in your cart for you?”

At somewhere in the neighborhood of 20-50 reviews Amazon will start building the web for you.

Our author sold many many more than that, but those friends/family/random people didn’t review it.

Ahhh, my fellow rugged American individualists…. most people are not like that, and want to read something that has a good review that other people liked, a lot, like 4 and 5 stars a lot.

Who can get those reviews for you?

Well, certainly we tell everyone we know about you and ask, over and over, for reviews, but if people don’t know you, why are they listening to me? They want to see someone else write one. They want to know what to write. Are you going to judge their writing skills? Will some jerk on Amazon judge their writing skills? Will someone blame them if your book turns out to be a flop? (If we publish you, you’re not a flop. We know what we’re doing when we choose a book to publish.)

What is your strategy for getting reviews?

Will you send out a newsletter?

Advanced reader copies?

Will you ask today, and next Wednesday, and the following Thursday, again and again, “Did you write that review for me yet? Can I give you a sample and a bottle of wine to thank you for your effort?”

That is what sales is. Asking, knocking on the door, again, and again, and again.

In the old days you only had to do that with agents. Today, the book industry has blown wide open. And this lets in more older authors, BIPOC, LGBTQ, and women. Great! But, those folks are going through publishers who don’t have an auto-order for a thousand books at Barnes and Noble.

Which book are you going to buy with your limited income? The one with two reviews? Or the one with 30, and Mary, who bought it, also bought The DaVinci Code, which you loved too!

I can’t tell you a magic number: this many reviews = this many sales.

And for that I am truly sorry.

But, one thing we can do, list the Kindle for free. Ask people, and ask them again, and go over to their house and help them to download your book free and then help them write a review.

And if your book isn’t running a free promotion, this does mean, in the case of Amazon, that your friend or relative may have to buy the book on Amazon to be able to leave a review there. It isn’t always the case, but it is sometimes true. And that could end up costing them, or you, if you give them the cost, the price of the book or anthology.

And, so what?

This is the cost of doing business.

This is the cost of a latte, or two.

And you already do it ALL THE TIME anyway. Yes, you do:

When we help each other out through reviewing, we help ourselves out, too. It’s a matter of literary survival.

IS THIS CHEATING?

And what about that local book club you belong to? Are they reading your book and your friend’s book? If not, why not? Have you asked them to? Are they supporting you? It is, really, a small thing to ask, but if you have a mystery book club and you or your friend managed to get a publisher to publish your mystery, then why would they not read it? Maybe they cannot read it until next year, okay, but they put it in the rotation. And then you help them leave reviews.

None of these things is going to transform you into a New York Times bestseller overnight, but I don’t know how else you’re ever going to even begin to head in that direction, or how the indie publishers who do this work on a shoe-string are going to keep being there to give no-name authors the chance they deserve.

So, if this is a serious thing for you, you want to “make it” at this, you’d like to at least make enough $ someday for a nice vacation or a monthly car payment, you have to start digging away at this notoriety problem we all have by taking your eyes off of your manuscript long enough to help each other out. 

BY THE WAY: It’s never too late to leave a review. You can start a whole new conversation by the review you post today.

SO BE A MENSCH: get the kindle of Bill’s book, for free, and post a review in the next week:

Can’t read that fast? Skim it, just to see what the writing is like. You’ll be impressed enough to know he deserves a review.

TO-DO:

#1. Get Bill’s book for free and review it.

#2. Develop a group of like-minded authors or friends and relatives and book club members who solemnly promise to give you a review in a timely fashion (within a month of publication).

#3. Buy books and give them to your local library and as gifts, etc. (or buy yourself the cheap Kindle version so you can post a review).

#4. Ask that any reading groups you belong to read your books.

#5. Create a budget for book purchases.

#6. Help people who may not know how to post a review post reviews for you, and help them write one.

#7. Keep the reviews short and sweet. “I loved it; you’ll love it too.” “Fast and fun read.” “Great way to spend a day at the beach!” 

Thanks so much for your interest in DPP and for reading this blog. We love publishing people who the big guys ignore, and we thank you for helping us do what we love to do.

We’ll be back with more posts about this as we have time during this season of final grades for Dianne’s students, and awards-nomination season for our authors and their books!

Review Bill’s book!

HOW TO SELL YOUR BOOK, POST 4: THE KEY TO SELL THE BOOK OF AN UNKOWN AUTHOR

Why do you try a new restaurant in your town?

Is it because you’re desperate to get out of the house, have someone else cook for you, or do you like to be the first to try anything new in town, or maybe you’re a foodie?

Or is it because your local paper told you it was good? The food critic on the town Facebook page said it was yummy. The neighbor on Nextdoor said it was a lot of food!

Who are you really? Who knows about you? Are you a former president, co-writing a book with another famous person, and your already overflowing wallet gets a little harder to get into your back pocket?

Or are you just… you? Like me, you could just be a writer, writing quietly at home.

Well, if your book is going to sell, newbie to being published, it’s going to sell online (and maybe 10 copies at your local bookseller). If you pay-to-play, and the “publisher” gives you a box with a thousand books in it, where are you putting them? On a shelf… at home?

It’s not a secret. When your book is available, in print, you have a few days, to a month, where your book is “hot,” meaning the people who know you, or who are local to you, are noticing it. Then, it’s over, and you should turn your focus to your next book.

That ride was short!

It reminds me of when I did community theater as a kid. We would practice almost every Saturday from January to June, and then, two weekend performances, Sat. & Sun., so four total, and it was over. Photos went in the local paper after the fact, and the lights went down until the following January.

You want your book to sell, to be a topic of conversation, to be on NPR! I know I do. But NPR doesn’t know you, and even if they did, there are so many other people who have a track record who also put out books the exact same day and time as you about the same thing, and they are getting on NPR, not you, because they were already on there two years ago.

Okay Captain Bringdown. Now what?

What matter most of all are reviews of your book until you are famous enough not to need them.

What I want most, as an author, is to be read. I want to know someone liked my book/story/poem. And sales would be nice too

Most new authors will generate most of their sales from Amazon. You will probably generate more sales than you will reviews. Our first book sold into the hundreds on Amazon, but got 9 reviews there.

Nine reviews is not building a web. It’s not being suggested to people. “Mary bought Book A and Book B, you bought Book B. Mary gave Book B a high review, and Book A. Would you like to look at Book A? Amazon actually asks me on my Alexa about the authors I buy for my daughter. “Grace Lin has a new book out. Can I put it in your cart for you?”

At somewhere in the neighborhood of 20-50 reviews Amazon will start building the web for you.

Our author sold many many more than that, but those friends/family/random people didn’t review it.

Ahhh, my fellow rugged American individualists…. most people are not like that, and want to read something that has a good review that other people liked, a lot, like 4 and 5 stars a lot.

Who can get those reviews for you?

Well, certainly we tell everyone we know about you and ask, over and over, for reviews, but if people don’t know you, why are they listening to me? They want to see someone else write one. They want to know what to write. Are you going to judge their writing skills? Will some jerk on Amazon judge their writing skills? Will someone blame them if your book turns out to be a flop? (If we publish you, you’re not a flop. We know what we’re doing when we choose a book to publish.)

What is your strategy for getting reviews?

Will you send out a newsletter?

Advanced reader copies?

Will you ask today, and next Wednesday, and the following Thursday, again and again, “Did you write that review for me yet? Can I give you a sample and a bottle of wine to thank you for your effort?”

That is what sales is. Asking, knocking on the door, again, and again, and again.

In the old days you only had to do that with agents. Today, the book industry has blown wide open. And this lets in more older authors, BIPOC, LGBTQ, and women. Great! But, those folks are going through publishers who don’t have an auto-order for a thousand books at Barnes and Noble.

Which book are you going to buy with your limited income? The one with two reviews? Or the one with 30, and Mary, who bought it, also bought The DaVinci Code, which you loved too!

I can’t tell you a magic number: this many reviews = this many sales.

And for that I am truly sorry.

But, one thing we can do, list the Kindle for free. Ask people, and ask them again, and go over to their house and help them to download your book free and then help them write a review.

And if your book isn’t running a free promotion, this does mean, in the case of Amazon, that your friend or relative may have to buy the book on Amazon to be able to leave a review there. It isn’t always the case, but it is sometimes true. And that could end up costing them, or you, if you give them the cost, the price of the book or anthology.

And, so what?

This is the cost of doing business.

This is the cost of a latte, or two.

And you already do it ALL THE TIME anyway. Yes, you do:

When we help each other out through reviewing, we help ourselves out, too. It’s a matter of literary survival.

IS THIS CHEATING?

And what about that local book club you belong to? Are they reading your book and your friend’s book? If not, why not? Have you asked them to? Are they supporting you? It is, really, a small thing to ask, but if you have a mystery book club and you or your friend managed to get a publisher to publish your mystery, then why would they not read it? Maybe they cannot read it until next year, okay, but they put it in the rotation. And then you help them leave reviews.

None of these things is going to transform you into a New York Times bestseller overnight, but I don’t know how else you’re ever going to even begin to head in that direction, or how the indie publishers who do this work on a shoe-string are going to keep being there to give no-name authors the chance they deserve.

So, if this is a serious thing for you, you want to “make it” at this, you’d like to at least make enough $ someday for a nice vacation or a monthly car payment, you have to start digging away at this notoriety problem we all have by taking your eyes off of your manuscript long enough to help each other out. 

BY THE WAY: It’s never too late to leave a review. You can start a whole new conversation by the review you post today.

SO BE A MENSCH: get the kindle of Bill’s book, for free, and post a review in the next week:

Can’t read that fast? Skim it, just to see what the writing is like. You’ll be impressed enough to know he deserves a review.

TO-DO:

#1. Get Bill’s book for free and review it.

#2. Develop a group of like-minded authors or friends and relatives and book club members who solemnly promise to give you a review in a timely fashion (within a month of publication).

#3. Buy books and give them to your local library and as gifts, etc. (or buy yourself the cheap Kindle version so you can post a review).

#4. Ask that any reading groups you belong to read your books.

#5. Create a budget for book purchases.

#6. Help people who may not know how to post a review post reviews for you, and help them write one.

#7. Keep the reviews short and sweet. “I loved it; you’ll love it too.” “Fast and fun read.” “Great way to spend a day at the beach!” 

Thanks so much for your interest in DPP and for reading this blog. We love publishing people who the big guys ignore, and we thank you for helping us do what we love to do.

We’ll be back with more posts about this as we have time during this season of final grades for Dianne’s students, and awards-nomination season for our authors and their books!

Review Bill’s book!

HOW TO SELL YOUR BOOK, POST 4: THE KEY TO SELL THE BOOK OF AN UNKOWN AUTHOR

Why do you try a new restaurant in your town?

Is it because you’re desperate to get out of the house, have someone else cook for you, or do you like to be the first to try anything new in town, or maybe you’re a foodie?

Or is it because your local paper told you it was good? The food critic on the town Facebook page said it was yummy. The neighbor on Nextdoor said it was a lot of food!

Who are you really? Who knows about you? Are you a former president, co-writing a book with another famous person, and your already overflowing wallet gets a little harder to get into your back pocket?

Or are you just… you? Like me, you could just be a writer, writing quietly at home.

Well, if your book is going to sell, newbie to being published, it’s going to sell online (and maybe 10 copies at your local bookseller). If you pay-to-play, and the “publisher” gives you a box with a thousand books in it, where are you putting them? On a shelf… at home?

It’s not a secret. When your book is available, in print, you have a few days, to a month, where your book is “hot,” meaning the people who know you, or who are local to you, are noticing it. Then, it’s over, and you should turn your focus to your next book.

That ride was short!

It reminds me of when I did community theater as a kid. We would practice almost every Saturday from January to June, and then, two weekend performances, Sat. & Sun., so four total, and it was over. Photos went in the local paper after the fact, and the lights went down until the following January.

You want your book to sell, to be a topic of conversation, to be on NPR! I know I do. But NPR doesn’t know you, and even if they did, there are so many other people who have a track record who also put out books the exact same day and time as you about the same thing, and they are getting on NPR, not you, because they were already on there two years ago.

Okay Captain Bringdown. Now what?

What matter most of all are reviews of your book until you are famous enough not to need them.

What I want most, as an author, is to be read. I want to know someone liked my book/story/poem. And sales would be nice too

Most new authors will generate most of their sales from Amazon. You will probably generate more sales than you will reviews. Our first book sold into the hundreds on Amazon, but got 9 reviews there.

Nine reviews is not building a web. It’s not being suggested to people. “Mary bought Book A and Book B, you bought Book B. Mary gave Book B a high review, and Book A. Would you like to look at Book A? Amazon actually asks me on my Alexa about the authors I buy for my daughter. “Grace Lin has a new book out. Can I put it in your cart for you?”

At somewhere in the neighborhood of 20-50 reviews Amazon will start building the web for you.

Our author sold many many more than that, but those friends/family/random people didn’t review it.

Ahhh, my fellow rugged American individualists…. most people are not like that, and want to read something that has a good review that other people liked, a lot, like 4 and 5 stars a lot.

Who can get those reviews for you?

Well, certainly we tell everyone we know about you and ask, over and over, for reviews, but if people don’t know you, why are they listening to me? They want to see someone else write one. They want to know what to write. Are you going to judge their writing skills? Will some jerk on Amazon judge their writing skills? Will someone blame them if your book turns out to be a flop? (If we publish you, you’re not a flop. We know what we’re doing when we choose a book to publish.)

What is your strategy for getting reviews?

Will you send out a newsletter?

Advanced reader copies?

Will you ask today, and next Wednesday, and the following Thursday, again and again, “Did you write that review for me yet? Can I give you a sample and a bottle of wine to thank you for your effort?”

That is what sales is. Asking, knocking on the door, again, and again, and again.

In the old days you only had to do that with agents. Today, the book industry has blown wide open. And this lets in more older authors, BIPOC, LGBTQ, and women. Great! But, those folks are going through publishers who don’t have an auto-order for a thousand books at Barnes and Noble.

Which book are you going to buy with your limited income? The one with two reviews? Or the one with 30, and Mary, who bought it, also bought The DaVinci Code, which you loved too!

I can’t tell you a magic number: this many reviews = this many sales.

And for that I am truly sorry.

But, one thing we can do, list the Kindle for free. Ask people, and ask them again, and go over to their house and help them to download your book free and then help them write a review.

And if your book isn’t running a free promotion, this does mean, in the case of Amazon, that your friend or relative may have to buy the book on Amazon to be able to leave a review there. It isn’t always the case, but it is sometimes true. And that could end up costing them, or you, if you give them the cost, the price of the book or anthology.

And, so what?

This is the cost of doing business.

This is the cost of a latte, or two.

And you already do it ALL THE TIME anyway. Yes, you do:

When we help each other out through reviewing, we help ourselves out, too. It’s a matter of literary survival.

IS THIS CHEATING?

And what about that local book club you belong to? Are they reading your book and your friend’s book? If not, why not? Have you asked them to? Are they supporting you? It is, really, a small thing to ask, but if you have a mystery book club and you or your friend managed to get a publisher to publish your mystery, then why would they not read it? Maybe they cannot read it until next year, okay, but they put it in the rotation. And then you help them leave reviews.

None of these things is going to transform you into a New York Times bestseller overnight, but I don’t know how else you’re ever going to even begin to head in that direction, or how the indie publishers who do this work on a shoe-string are going to keep being there to give no-name authors the chance they deserve.

So, if this is a serious thing for you, you want to “make it” at this, you’d like to at least make enough $ someday for a nice vacation or a monthly car payment, you have to start digging away at this notoriety problem we all have by taking your eyes off of your manuscript long enough to help each other out. 

BY THE WAY: It’s never too late to leave a review. You can start a whole new conversation by the review you post today.

SO BE A MENSCH: get the kindle of Bill’s book, for free, and post a review in the next week:

Can’t read that fast? Skim it, just to see what the writing is like. You’ll be impressed enough to know he deserves a review.

 

TO-DO:

#1. Get Bill’s book for free and review it.

#2. Develop a group of like-minded authors or friends and relatives and book club members who solemnly promise to give you a review in a timely fashion (within a month of publication).

#3. Buy books and give them to your local library and as gifts, etc. (or buy yourself the cheap Kindle version so you can post a review).

#4. Ask that any reading groups you belong to read your books.

#5. Create a budget for book purchases.

#6. Help people who may not know how to post a review post reviews for you, and help them write one.

#7. Keep the reviews short and sweet. “I loved it; you’ll love it too.” “Fast and fun read.” “Great way to spend a day at the beach!” 

Thanks so much for your interest in DPP and for reading this blog. We love publishing people who the big guys ignore, and we thank you for helping us do what we love to do.

We’ll be back with more posts about this as we have time during this season of final grades for Dianne’s students, and awards-nomination season for our authors and their books!

Review Bill’s book!

FREE BOOK FRIDAY: IT’S A MYSTERY

Damn that’s a good-looking book!

You know you want it!

And this weekend you can have it, free!

Yes, we’re giving it away to say thanks for your support of the Hawkshaw mysteries.

If you get it, and you read it, would you be so kind as to drop it a review on Amazon?

Or Goodreads?

Bill is an indie author with an indie press who wrote one-helluva hard-boiled mystery, so he can use all the reviews he can get to help people find out about this wonderful book. He has been called the successor to Raymond Chandler by some reviewers, and they’re not exaggerating.

But, review or not, you can have it, no strings attached. We want you to have the book, and to enjoy it, on us, as a way to say “Thanks!” So get your free copy today!

It didn’t occur to me then that Kennedy was rich. All I saw was this skinny, unassuming guy with a New England accent. His suit hung on his bones as though he were still recovering from the South Pacific, but his grin was a Steinway piano. Kennedy had the kind of charm that made you like him even when he was winning the girl you wanted. How do you outmaneuver a romancer like that?

THE PROOF, AND NOTHING BUT THE PROOF

It’s time for the final read-through before the curtain goes up on Let’s Say Jack Kennedy Killed the Girl, released by our imprint, Hawkshaw Press. As with every book we print, we check them once, we check them twice, and we check them a few times after that to be sure they’re clean, like Griffin’s case.

This book is getting great reviews and winning awards even in its proof phase. You’re going to want a signed copy.

And you’re going to want in on a chance to talk to Bill! 

And maybe you find yourself behind the 8-ball, and you need someone who believes you when you say you were in Montreal at the time. You know who to call:

Q: WHAT IS HOTTER, AND MORE BUTTERED, THAN MOVIE THEATRE POPCORN?

Um, yeah, that would be Instant Noodles, Volume 3, “Hot Buttered Holidays!” And we use real, sweet, creamery butter, because it’s not nice to fool Mother Nature.

It’s available December 1st., the lit mag, not a tub of butter.

Why, December, that’s months and months away.

It is almost Thanksgiving, People.

There’s no leaves left to peep at!

Are you ready for the cavalcade of holidays?

Great!

If not, you may want to linger a bit longer in the now distant summer!

Why not try a lovely little number form Instant NoodlesHot Fun in the Summertime,” like “First Morning After Moving,” by Greg Hill, or visit “The H.K. INN,” with Virginia Watts?

How about a memoir from a veteran for Veteran’s Day?

Enjoy your light-noodlie lunch now, before it’s stuffing-yourself time!

Mmmmm… tasty.

ANOTHER WAY TO THANK A VETERAN

This is a great story in The Washington Post. Click here to see it. The WAPO costs like $5/month too; you might consider a subscription. I love mine. But… back to the point:

The man who took this photo, Jim Roberts, is looking for this woman, and one other, to thank them for bringing a bright spot to his life when he was on his tour of duty in Vietnam. YOU might know who these women are. Pass this article around, and maybe you can help Jim find these “donut dollies.”

In addition to that, he has a self-published book of his time in the war. that is used to fund the Veterans’ Breakfast Club. Pick up a copy of his book, and you will be donating your entire purchase to this veterans’ group!

We can never thank veterans enough for their sacrifice, so all these little things help!

THANK A VETERAN, LIKE WILLIAM F. CRANDELL

It’s Veteran’s Day in the US of A, and there are lots of things you can do to thank a veteran, like picking up the tab at Starbucks, or saying, “Thank you for your service,” or many other things.

One thing you can do is to read a man’s book. That’s right; there is nothing you can do that will make a writer happier than reading something he, or she, wrote.

William Crandell, who is a veteran of the Vietnam War, happens to be a really talented writer in addition to being a veteran. He won the best short story nationally in 2019, in addition to his win in the state of Delaware.

Bill is releasing his first novel, one in a series of four starring hardboiled detective Jack Griffin, and he has already gotten a stellar review for it from Midwest Reviews.

Am I using a post about Veteran’s Day to hawk a man’s book? I am. It is no small thing to have served in a combat zone. 

And, therefore, why not? What better gift could you give Bill than to read his book? He served; we should care, and while we have limited time and what-have-you, this is one way people who like writers and creative writing can also add in appreciation for veterans. 

And, aside from that, this is really a very well-written book. It’s gonna grab you and transport you. And it’s fun; it has all that Humphrey-Bogart-patter you love in a good noir mystery.

So, you know, get a copy. Or give a copy. Today.

Thanks for your service Bill.